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    It was an object which was usually offered to the gods, with the sistrum; it was presented to guests at a feast by their host; and it was held by priestesses at religious festivals.

    It was either worn on the neck or carried in the left hand; and it was an emblem which brought joy to the bearer. Interesting examples of the pendent menat in the British Museum are No.

    On the one side is the prenomen of Amenophis III. Behold Osiris Ani the scribe who recordeth the holy offerings of all the gods, 2 who saith: Thou risest, thou shinest, 3 making bright thy mother [Nut], crowned king of the gods.

    May he give splendour, and power, and triumph, and 5 a coming-forth [ i. The god Khepera is usually represented with a beetle for a head; and the scarab, or beetle, was sacred to him.

    The name means "to become, to turn, to roll," and the abstract noun kheperu may be rendered by "becomings," or "evolutions.

    Khepera is a phase of Tmu, the night-sun, at the twelfth hour of the night, when he "becomes" the rising sun or Harmachis i.

    He is also described as " Khepera in the morning, Ra at mid-day, and Tmu in the evening. The goddess Nut represented the sky, and perhaps also the exact place where the sun rose.

    She was the wife of Seb, the Earth-god, and gave birth to Isis, Osiris, and other gods. One of her commonest titles is "mother of the gods.

    She was the daughter and mother of Ra. See Lanzone, Dizionario, p. Manu is the name given to the mountains on the western bank of the Nile, opposite Thebes, wherein was situated tu Manu , "the mountain of Manu," the chief site of rock-hewn tombs.

    Maat, "daughter of the Sun, and queen of the gods," is the personification of righteousness and truth and justice. In many papyri she is represented as leading the deceased into the Hall of Double Maat, where his heart is to be weighed against her emblem.

    She usually wears the feather, emblematic of Truth, and is called the "lady of heaven": She is sometimes represented blind-fold: For figures of the goddess in bronze and stone, see Nos.

    Strictly speaking, he is the rising sun, and is one of the most important forms of Horus. As god of mid-day and evening he is called Ra-Harmachis and Tmu-Harmachis respectively.

    The sphinx at Gizeh was dedicated to him. Hail all ye gods of the Temple of the Soul,[4] who weigh heaven and earth in the balance, and who provide food and abundance of meat.

    Hail Tatunen,[5] One, 7 creator of mankind and of the substance of the gods of the south and of the north, of the west and of the east.

    Ascribe [ye] praise unto Ra, the lord of heaven, the 8 Prince, Life, Health, and Strength, the Creator of the gods, and adore ye him in his beautiful Presence as he riseth in the atet [6] boat.

    Thoth[7] and Maat both are thy recorders. Thine enemy[8] is given to the 10 fire, the evil one hath fallen; his arms are bound, and his legs hath Ra taken from him.

    The children of 11 impotent revolt shall never rise up again. According to the Egyptian belief man consisted of a body xa , a soul ba , an intelligence xu , and ka , The word ka means "image," the Greek ei?

    The ka seems to have been the "ghost," as we should say, of a man, and it has been defined as his abstract personality, to which, after death, the Egyptians gave a material form.

    It was a subordinate part of the human being during life, but after death it became active; and to it the offerings brought to the tomb by the relatives of the dead were dedicated.

    It was believed that it returned to the body and had a share in its re-vivification. As the sun sets in the west and rises again in the cast, so the dead man is laid in his tomb on the western bank of the Nile, and after being acquitted in the Hall of judgment, proceeds to the east to begin a new existence.

    On this word, see Naville, Litanie du Soleil , p. Tatunen, or Tenen was, like Seb with whom he was identified, the god of the earth; his name is often joined to that of Ptah, and he is then described as the creator of gods and men, and the maker of the egg of the sun and of the moon.

    See Lanzone, Dizionario , p. This god was, in one aspect, a destroyer of created things; compare , Naville, op.

    The Egyptian god, Anubis, would be waiting with a scale. There was an ostrich feather on one side of the scale and the god would put the heart of the person that died on the other side.

    If the feather weighed more than the heart it proved the person led a good life and was allowed to go to the afterlife.

    There are other ancient Egyptian gods that appear in the Book of the Dead. Each has their own purpose. The Egyptian people believed that one of the most important things in life was happiness.

    Most of the ancient Egyptians seemed to be optimists and so they thought that everyone would pass the test. Since the Egyptians lived in a culture where everyone had their own social status, they also believed that the poor people would be poor in the afterlife and rich people would have the same rich status.

    Those that have studied some of the copies of the Book of the Dead have noticed that, for people other than the pharaohs, it appears that the artists and priests had a standard copy that they wrote on papyrus.

    The only areas that were blank was the name of the person that had passed away. This would have made it a lot easier to include in a burial tomb because they could make up copies ahead of time and just fill in the name.

    One of these copies is on exhibit at the British Museum. To quell the PR nightmare of the gem fiasco, the museum decides to reopen the Tomb of Senef.

    An astounding Egyptian temple, it was a popular museum exhibit until the s, when it was quietly closed. But when the tomb is unsealed in preparation for its gala reopening, the killings--and whispers of an ancient curse--begin again.

    And the catastrophic opening itself sets the stage for the final battle between the two brothers: Hardcover , pages. Pendergast 7 , Diogenes 3.

    To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about The Book of the Dead , please sign up.

    Do the series have to be read in order? Jamie You'll miss some character development if you don't read them in order. See 2 questions about The Book of the Dead….

    Lists with This Book. Jul 19, Sean Gibson rated it really liked it. Does that mean there should, similarly, be an award named after me?

    In keeping with tradition, once I finished The Book of the Dead , I climbed to the top of a tall mountain, closed my eyes, and meditated for seven straight days and seven straight nights to find the right comparison for this review.

    After climbing down from the mountain and cleansing myself of the detritus that had accumulated from having not moved to visit the bathroom for a week, I reached my conclusion: If you did, however, you would be performing the proverbially damning act of making an ass out of u and me, because Frosties taste like nothing else.

    In a blindfold taste test, I could pick out a Frosty every single time. And, yet, Lincoln and Child have created something utterly distinctive.

    It may be, at least in part, the fact that they are just better than the majority of their peers when it comes to their technical skills—they are, to be sure, craftsmen of the highest order when it comes to plot, pacing, and overall story construction.

    They are also solid writers, and I say that not as a tepid endorsement of them relative to others working in the same genre; they truly are good.

    But, it goes beyond that as well. Nowhere is that more evident than in The Book of the Dead. This book features aspects of all of its predecessors—characters, locations, plotlines, tone, atmosphere…it draws on so much of what has come before, yet combines it all in a way that makes this book the perfect encapsulation of the series as a whole thus far, at any rate.

    What happened over the last 50 pages? It would be over the top and off-brand and completely unnecessary. So, that gets us back to 4 stars.

    Preston and Child have in store for our heroes going forward. View all 31 comments. I normally never buy NY Times bestsellers, as it's usually the morons of America that cause the shittiest books ever written to end up on this list.

    The Book of the Dead was an exception I made. I just finished this book and I'm still reeling. It's full of complex, well-developed characters, it has an evil genius part Hannibal Lecter, part Sideshow Bob conspiring to ruin lives, a cooped-up myst I normally never buy NY Times bestsellers, as it's usually the morons of America that cause the shittiest books ever written to end up on this list.

    The writers are too smart for you, and they stay 10 steps ahead at all times. The evil genius isn't just bad, he's a meniachal nut-case that you almost have to admire for his psychotic brilliance.

    His brother, the equally brilliant FBI agent, gets his ass kicked just enough to make him believable, but not a wussy.

    They give away nothing about the other books, so I can go back to number one and start reading without knowing what happened. When a book is just a story, I get driven nuts.

    Good authors, like these ones, include other shit in their books because they're SMART and they know how to keep a reader interested.

    This book will have you googling shit, looking for places on maps, trying to find out more information about historical figures, downloading classical musicians you'd never ever heard of, and checking up on Oscar Wilde quotes, etc.

    THIS, to me, is what makes a novel great: Uhhh, two words for you: Here are some more: I can keep this up all day. View all 9 comments.

    This was so good! You would need to go to book 5 Brimstone to start the book trio between the Pendergast brothers. Aloysius is an FBI agent and reminds me of Sherlock.

    Extremely intelligent, calm and resourceful. Minus the whole cocaine habit. Diogenes is his brilliant, psychotic brother and This was so good!

    Diogenes is his brilliant, psychotic brother and he makes me think of Moriarty. Yeah you're right, they have some weird parents and relatives to give them those names!!

    They are both intelligent, brilliant and 5 steps ahead of us stupid people. Back to the 7th book in the series and the 3rd book in the Diogenes series.

    Just start at Relic 1st book in the series and read the books in consecutive order. I guess I am laying all the groundwork in this review so you do not start with this book.

    This is not a stand alone! This book involves Egyptian curses, the prison system and love that turns into revenge and hate!

    Really, that's all that I can say about the plot without ruining book 5 Brimstone and 6 Dance of Death. If you want action, suspense along with some creepy factors in a series, go read this series.

    Each book has a great plot, excellent technical and science details along with memorable characters. View all 5 comments. I am marking this 5 stars, but it is more like 4.

    I hate to take any stars from Preston and Child, but, while the book was great, I did not care for the climax very much.

    The story was an action packed resolution to the Diogenes trilogy in the same vein as the other Pendergast novels that I have come to know and love.

    I think where the book and the climax lost me as it almost felt rushed to resolve both the book and the trilogy. But, even with my minor complaints, this series continues to be awesome, I still highly recommend it, and I cannot wait for the next one!

    Jul 13, Emma rated it liked it. Usually I really enjoy these novels so I was disappointed that I didn't enjoy this as much. I didn't think the Event that caused so much hatred between the two brothers was that impressive in terms of the lengths Diogenes went to to destroy his brother.

    This was definitely the poorest of the Diogenes trilogy. The next in series is also not popular with fans of the series as it is in a different setting and without the supporting cast so I may give that one a miss.

    A tepid contribution to the serie Usually I really enjoy these novels so I was disappointed that I didn't enjoy this as much.

    A tepid contribution to the series. I really hope it picks up again. Great conclusion to the Diogenes Trilogy within the Pendergast series!

    Nothing like a bombshell ending to make you immediately want to pick up the next book. Oct 03, J. Grice rated it really liked it Shelves: Another excellent thriller featuring Agent Pendergast.

    The last of the hair-raising Diogenes trilogy within the Pendergast series. I loved this trilogy. This last one was really a nail-biter and gave me goosebumps.

    Prepare for several travesties where you are constantly asking yourself what is really going on and wondering if the characters can recover.

    Resilience can be found in the strangest of places. If you push a person too far, you just might find out wha The last of the hair-raising Diogenes trilogy within the Pendergast series.

    If you push a person too far, you just might find out what they are made of. Oct 01, Karl Marberger rated it really liked it Shelves: Lots of action and good dialogue.

    Great to see the whole ensemble of recurring characters interact. Might write a review of sorts for the Pendergast-Diogenes trilogy later.

    I thoroughly enjoyed this, although I find myself having to suspend my disbelief at times, and wishing that the resolution at the end panned out differently.

    Highly readable, thrilling, and pretty darn hard to put down - I'm sure the rate I've been finishing up these books was a positive sign.

    Suspense and mystery lovers. One dreary December evening some years ago, I slogged in to my local Fred Meyer, stamping snow off my shoes, and encountered a tall, friendly, dapper gentlemen hawking paperback books near the door.

    He introduced himself as Douglas Preston and said the book, Relic , was being made into a movie. I thought, Yeah, sure. So why are you standing here in a deserted grocery store in Kennewick, Washington, on a night like this?

    I sort of felt sorry for the guy, so I bought the book. About 24 hours later, One dreary December evening some years ago, I slogged in to my local Fred Meyer, stamping snow off my shoes, and encountered a tall, friendly, dapper gentlemen hawking paperback books near the door.

    About 24 hours later, completely wrung out, I finished the book, wondering why I had so enjoyed being scared out of my mind.

    I decided that next time this pair published a book, I would get on the roller-coaster and take another ride. This one was a doozy! Reread in October great choice for the Halloween season!

    Five years was long enough for me to forget much of he plot and, therefore, be able to appreciate the suspense in The Book of the Dead. Also, having read several books in the Pendergast series lately, I was more engaged in sharing the adventures with characters I know.

    Jun 17, Chris rated it it was amazing. Forget James Patterson, folks, these guys know what they're doing and do it better than pretty much anyone. Thorough, well-researched storylines, but not the type i.

    Da Vinci Code that bogs down the thrust of the storytelling. Oh yeah, and most of their novels feature one of the most compelling protagonists in modern fiction Many of their books feature Pendergast as well as a host of recurring characters, and a few are stand-alones, but to make it simple, start with Relic and no, if you've seen the awful Pendergast-less movie, there is NO comparison , and its sequel, Reliquary, and go on to Cabinet of Curiosities, Still Life with Crows, and on to what is referred to as "The Diogenes trilogy", which is Brimstone, Dance of Death, and The Book of the Dead.

    Which is where this review begins. Needless to say, for those not drawn into the fold, as it were, I will try to keep spoilers to a minimum so don't read on any further.

    The novel completes the Diogenes Trilogy, which pits Pendergast against his diabolical younger brother, Diogenes, who--in the previous novel--concocted an elaborate scheme to eventually send his brother to prison, for a crime he didn't commit.

    But this was only the tip of the iceberg. Diogenes has a much larger, deadlier plan. The museum's hierarchy decide to best way to circumvent the "bad press" and public outcry is to reopen a revitalized century-old Egyptian exhibit, The Tomb of Senef.

    Of course, in the process of doing so, mysterious and gruesome murders occur, causing some to think the Grand Reopening of the Tomb should be postponed, but of course the show must go on!

    As Diogenes's plan unfolds, which entails secretive visits to Pendergasts' young ward from The Cabinet of Curiousities, Constance Greene, in order to seduce her with his version of the truth, Pendergast manages to escape prison in an attempt to thwart Diogenes's Coup de Grace at the museum's Grand Reopening of the Tomb.

    This might seem like a LOT going on and it is, but the authors deftly and smartly interweave the plot and subplots in such a way to make it seamless.

    The stunning climax is fitting, and the surprise at the end will leave readers wanting to pick up the next novel, The Wheel of Darkness.

    View all 6 comments. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The Book of the Dead is the last of three in the Agent Pendergast series.

    I'm not sure why it's a trilogy, though, because there are actually six or 7 books with that character and they're all somehow related. Dance of Death and this book focus on the hatred and battle between the Pendergast brothers, FBI Special Agent Aloysius and his brilliant but murderously pathological brother Diogenes.

    The previous book left off with Diogenes framing his brother for some horrific crimes and then stealing m The Book of the Dead is the last of three in the Agent Pendergast series.

    The previous book left off with Diogenes framing his brother for some horrific crimes and then stealing millions of dollars worth of diamonds from the Museum of History.

    Aloysius goes to prison and Diogenes drops out of sight These two books reunite some old favorite characters from early stories.

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    I couldn't find any information on the so-called "Higginbottom region" but maybe it's out there somewhere. I know there's at least one more book now, one that focuses more on Constance Green.

    I haven't decided whether I want to read it or not. I've been alternately exasperated, bored, and enthralled with the story so far I tend to enjoy books in a series more and more when I've developed a "relationship" with the characters.

    This may not be the best written book in the series, but it feels like it to me because it is so true to the characters.

    Raise your hand if you really think a detective can be as near-omniscient as Sherlock Holmes. Now, that being said, if you still enjoy suspending your disbelief enough to enjoy the improbable mastery of minutiae that Arthur Conan Doyle as Warning: Now, that being said, if you still enjoy suspending your disbelief enough to enjoy the improbable mastery of minutiae that Arthur Conan Doyle ascribed to Holmes, you would probably enjoy the Pendergast novels of Lincoln Child and Douglas Preston.

    Some of the dust jackets of the hardbound versions of these novels compare Special F. Agent Pendergast and the Consulting Detective known as Holmes.

    And how about all of those wonderful disguises used by both Aloysius and Diogenes Pendergast?! Frankly, if I had to believe the martial arts prowess demonstrated in one scene combined with the improbable escape in another, I would have exiled Child and Preston from the Wilsonian Library long ago.

    Although they are clearly set in the latter part of the 20th century or first part of this century, they have atmospherics redolent of medieval Italy, antebellum U.

    Child and Preston have an amazing ability to intertwine history and mystery within a modern conundrum. Not content with locked room mysteries, they insist on locked museum and locked prison mysteries, in spite of high-tech surveillance equipment and fail-safe procedures.

    Ancient artifacts and legends are juxtaposed against surprisingly modern technologies and methodologies. Most amazing to me in this novel was an introspective journey taken by Agent Pendergast at a critical point in the plot.

    For the purposes of the novel, it was an amazing way to handle exposition of the plot without resorting to a hokey dialogue. It was as suspenseful as many of the action scenes.

    There is a marvelous interplay between loyalty and betrayal played off between the various ongoing relationships we have seen developing in the course of the series, as well as the new one developing in this book.

    It may well be because of my interesting in the Ancient Near East in general and in Egyptology in specific that I found this book more satisfying than usual, but I think this may have been the best yet.

    Aug 09, JoJo rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Recommended to JoJo by: Although all three books can be read without the other, if you read the last one first like i did, it ruins earlier books because you find out stuff ahead, like reading the last chapter of a book first.

    Aug 10, C-shaw rated it it was amazing. Their writing is crisp and action-packed, with short chapters that can be read in a hurry.

    One of the things I enjoy about a book is to come across words with which I am not familiar, in which case I usually look up the definition and write it in the book margin, thus hopefully improving my vocabulary.

    This book is No. You never fail to steer me to good reads, Matthew. I neglected everything and read pages in two days.

    I feel like all my reviews for the Pendergast series are starting to sound the same, I'm gushing as if in love about how fantastic the books are but its still true, this story is phenomenal and it makes you want to read another and another, this could easily have thirty volumes and I would still want to read them all, as usual this book reads smooth as silk while the action cuts like a knife.

    The Book of The Dead is the standard great stuff that one would expect from the insightful and intelligen I feel like all my reviews for the Pendergast series are starting to sound the same, I'm gushing as if in love about how fantastic the books are but its still true, this story is phenomenal and it makes you want to read another and another, this could easily have thirty volumes and I would still want to read them all, as usual this book reads smooth as silk while the action cuts like a knife.

    The Book of The Dead is the standard great stuff that one would expect from the insightful and intelligent duo, their stories breathe a life of their own and to me they feel different than other novels.

    Our world is filled with books, one can find them everywhere but whenever I read a Pendergast novel I feel as if I was holding something of heft and value, there is knowledge in these pages; ancient cultures, science, architecture, folklore and mysticism, curses, artifacts and it all sounds real enough to touch and some of it is but I especially adore all the breathtaking characters both good and bad and some in-between, in my opinion they are invaluable to the books.

    I guess they speak to me, true love haha Pendergast lives in my mind beyond the pages of the book, that's how great he is.

    The third in the Diogenes Pendergast trilogy and seventh in the Aloysius Pendergast series I highly recommend starting with Relic, Pendergast 1 story continues on the wild hunt to catch and expose the elusive Diogenes who is conveniently presumed to be dead by everyone but the small circle of our heroes.

    The Queen of Narnia, The Heart of Eternity, The Indigo Ghost, Ultima Thule, The Fourth of July, The Zanzibar Green and of course Lucifer's Heart, all precious diamonds that were stole in the last installment are destroyed by Diogenes and arrive pulverized into a rainbow colored snow to the museum as a final act of madness and show of power.

    The previous book was simply fantastic and it exposed Diogenes' identity but only to the reader, the entire museum still has no idea that not only is Diogenes alive but his secret identity is walking right under their noses.

    To make matters worse, Aloysius Pendergast is in a top security prison and everyone that has always been jealous of him is gunning for the guy to go down, he deals with that brilliantly, boy that was fun!

    Even though Aloysius is locked up he is the only one who can match up against his evil and twisted genius of a brother, their journey takes them half way through the globe and back.

    My personal favorite part of the tale was the prison sequence, well pretty much all of it, I don't want to spoil anything but what happens to Pendergast in the prison is nuts.

    I read all the parts while holding my breath, some I had to re-read because they were simply too good to only read once. Ingenious and stunning, no deus-ex machina way out of this puppy!

    Lots of stuff happens, there is also the museum exhibit with a tomb that appears to be cursed, madness and mayhem breaks out as usual, lovers of museum thrillers will have a ball with the Tomb of Senef and those who love Pendergast will gobble up everything he does and says.

    I was finally impressed with Constance, I never really gave her much thought before but through this book she became another strong contender for future stories and my dear Vincent D'Agosta, he was wonderful as was Laura Hayward.

    For some reason Laura Linney the actress kept popping into my head when Hayward's scenes came up, she was something, the woman can hold her own.

    This was such a tremendous journey with the two brothers that I'm not sad to see it over because I'm really looking forward to the next chapter, the next book sounds quite potent and meaty and I might need a bit of a break to let my brain prepare for another greatness of Preston and Child.

    I don't read them back to back on purpose as much as I really want to, after all it's not good to eat dessert three times a day, same with books, I save the good stuff to be savored when I'm really in the mood for greatness.

    Jun 03, Mike Moore rated it it was ok. Remember those old movies that blended cartoons and live action? This book reminded me of those, perhaps more the latter than the former.

    The book starts with promise, presenting some compelling scenes and introducing some believable characters. Than we're introduced to the villain and the hero, two ridiculous cartoons striding through a world of normals.

    The plot quickly spins out of the realm of the remotely plausible, as the cartoons seem to infect Remember those old movies that blended cartoons and live action?

    The plot quickly spins out of the realm of the remotely plausible, as the cartoons seem to infect those around them, transforming the hapless humans into wacky, goofy caricatures that can then careen wildly through what's left of my credulity.

    Any attempt to prevent spoilers ends here. I'm actually not that hard a case for this kind of thing. I'm generally happy to suspend disbelief and accept the world that the author wants to present, as long as its consistent and fulfills its objective in this case, pure entertainment.

    So, even though I couldn't read the scenes with Diogenes Pendergast without seeing a wild eyed animated Christopher Lloyd in my mind, I was enjoying the book enough for a generally favorable three stars review.

    There were two things that lost me though. First, I really want characters to have legitimate motivation. In this book, Diogenes is motivated to spend about a billion dollars, wantonly destroy half a million more in diamonds, dedicate about 15 years of his life to performing about man-years of work in a variety of disciplines that are not remotely related yeah okay, he's a cartoon, whatever , and kill dozens of people because You know, there was this thing that happened to him when he was a kid, and it just made him That's beyond what I can will away by suspension of disbelief.

    Why is she there? Why should we care about her? And why does Diogenes risk his whole plan to sneak into her room and seduce her?

    Okay fine, he's crazy like that he doesn't need a reason, but these are still the most ridiculous and seemingly pointless scenes of the whole book, and that's really saying something.

    Well, it turns out that the reason for it all is so that Constance can come from out of nowhere in the end of the book and kill Diogenes by wrestling him into a live volcano.

    She has to do it, because the main character can't bring himself to. She falls in as well. I'm pretty sure the volcano has some ominous name, like Mount Doom or the Gate of Hell or something.

    So we have pages and pages of painful scenes that have the sole purpose of manufacturing Golumn so that she can jump into a volcano.

    It's transparent in retrospect, because there was no other possible reason for those scenes to exist. That's beyond sloppy storytelling.

    View all 4 comments. I picked this book up from my local library for a dollar. I believe it was a dollar well spent. The creepy factor was right up there.

    I like how the authors used modern day techniques to achieve horrific situations. This was definitely a thrill ride and I enjoyed my time on it. Feb 05, Paul rated it it was ok Shelves: I enjoyed Douglas Preston's recent best-selling sci-fi thriller, Impact also reviewed here on Facebook , but did not much like this one, a bit of airport trash he co-wrote with Lincoln Child.

    It's not as bad as Ted Bell's Spy reviewed here: The Book of the Dead is one of a series of novels, with a cast of characters introduced and presumably more fully developed in earlier novels.

    Unfortunately, though I enjoyed Douglas Preston's recent best-selling sci-fi thriller, Impact also reviewed here on Facebook , but did not much like this one, a bit of airport trash he co-wrote with Lincoln Child.

    Unfortunately, though I think the authors intended it to be, it is anything but a stand-alone novel.

    Odd and peripheral characters are constantly being introduced with no explanation of what may have gone before -- two separate female characters had apparently been attacked and almost murdered in previous novels; another seems to a scientific and philosophical experiment, a year-old savant in the body of a woman in her 20s, with the social skills and worldly experience of a home-schooled year-old -- and you never quite grasp who these people are or why they are important.

    The main characters, two brothers, are well explained, though improbable -- one is an evil genius, the other a good genius, each gifted with essentially superhuman powers.

    And there's a female police captain, who is always referred to by her title, which is Captain of Homicide -- a most un-American kind of title, although she's NYPD.

    In parts of the book it is all too clear that two writers are at work, often at cross purposes. In a climactic scene, the evil brother retreats to his volcanic island fortress, and suspecting that the year-old year-old woman has tracked him down and is even now climbing the volcano to reach his fortress, barricades himself deep within, surrounded by 3-foot-thick stone walls -- yet he not only hears her knock on the door, he says "who's there?

    The plot, the cliffhangers, the main characters and some of the peripheral ones all have this in common: And yet this is not a comic book, or a fantasy like Harry Potter -- it's supposed to be a thriller, based in modern life and experience, and thus remotely possible.

    Well, it ain't, and I didn't like it. This book is the last of the little trilogy within the Pendergast series that started with Brimstone and Dance of Death.

    While I was really looking forward to reading it, I started out a bit slow, first because I was in the middle of a different book when my library order came in, and I started playing Dishonored on my and was trying to figure out what I was doing without dying too often.

    But then I got a few chapters in and couldn't stop reading! All sorts of suspenseful things were going on This book is the last of the little trilogy within the Pendergast series that started with Brimstone and Dance of Death.

    All sorts of suspenseful things were going on all at once, and this is one book where, if you read at least the previous book, you know exactly who the bad guy is, but none of the other characters do, and so you may find yourself yelling like me, "Noooo, don't listen to him!

    Don't go in there with him! In any case, really good fun. Never a dull moment at that Museum! Feb 21, kartik narayanan rated it liked it.

    The Book of the Dead is another so-so entry in the Pendergast-verse and brings the Diogenes trilogy to an end hopefully!

    It suffers from the same malaise as the previous couple of books in that the antagonist is boring and the story boils down to Batman chasing the Joker in the Dark Knight.

    There is no mystery and the protagonists are basically boring while having the ability to foresee random events. And the ending is ambiguous enough without any form of closure.

    I hope the next book The Book of the Dead is another so-so entry in the Pendergast-verse and brings the Diogenes trilogy to an end hopefully!

    I hope the next book will be a return to the core pendergast values. Jan 13, Rob Thompson rated it really liked it Shelves: This is the seventh book in the Special Agent Pendergast series.

    Also, it is the third and final installment to the trilogy concentrating on Pendergast and his relationship with Lieutenant Vincent D'Agosta in their pursuit to stop Pendergast's brother, Diogenes.

    Preston and Child call these books the Diogenes trilogy. The three books in the trilogy start with Brimstone in and continue with Dance of Death in This final book was released on May 30, and has been on the New York Times Best Seller list, reaching as high as 4 on the list.

    Special Agent Aloysius Pendergast is the focus of this novel as his evil brother Diogenes puts several plans into effect.

    One plan involves targeting Aloysius's dearest friends Concurrently, the New York Museum of Natural History has re-opened an old tomb, closed down decades ago.

    There are hints of the tomb being cursed, but most tombs do have a curse on them as a matter of course, as a protection against grave robbers. Not much is thought of the curse until a lighting technician is found savagely murdered.

    Later, a British Egyptologist goes mad and attacks a colleague; security is forced to shoot and kill him. When a replacement Egyptian specialist turns out to be the one woman Pendergast is in love with, everyone becomes suspicious of this coincidence.

    Their fears are not unfounded. By the end of the book the authors have, as expected, tied up all the loose ends. Like all their books, the pacing is fast, the plot far-fetched, and the the writing flows well.

    There is a lot to enjoy here. But as this was the final book in the Pendergast-Diogenes trilogy, some of the suspense was lost as the final outcome was pretty obvious.

    Thus only 4 stars not 5. A must read for all Preston-Child fans, but not the one to start with. Well, I guess the magnificent run of Pendergast novels couldn't last forever.

    This was a good book, but I felt cheated. The Tomb of Senef with its colourful history and its macabre 'curse' offered so many real opportunities.

    In the end, when The Event was revealed, the whole thing just fell flat. Also, I wasn't too impressed with the wrap-up of the whole Diogenes sequence.

    Is this the same Diogenes who was so masterfully powerful in Dance of Death Pendergast, 6? I don't want to r Well, I guess the magnificent run of Pendergast novels couldn't last forever.

    I don't want to reveal any spoilers, so I am unable to explain exactly why I thought the second half of this book was so unappealing.

    Suffice to say, it's probably a good thing this trilogy is now wrapped up, so that the authors can work on returning to form. Give us another Relic , guys!

    Jul 19, Alice rated it it was ok. If you can get past the plot, which is utterly preposterous, this is a pretty good action read. I found myself flipping past the criminal mastermind's rantings because after awhile, they get boring.

    I also I fail to see what help it is when he quotes things in French got that , Italian can guess at that , Russian nope , and Greek nope again , and then does not provide translations.

    Maybe the point is to let the author impress his readers. That got boring too. My interest picked up when the t If you can get past the plot, which is utterly preposterous, this is a pretty good action read.

    My interest picked up when the tables turned in the last few hundred pages. Wish I'd known that this was the last of a trilogy when I got it from the library.

    I downloaded it, so I didn't have a cover to look at. I got a ways in and the dialogue started talking about other crimes that the characters had been involved in.

    This is not a stand alone book! I always love picking up a Pendergast novel for when I want a fun and quick detective story.

    The finale of the Diogenes trilogy within the series didn't fail. Seriously though, with all the things that happen at that museum, you'd think they'd have shut down new programs by now.

    Your sense of reality definitely has to be suspended for this one but it's a fun ride. Oct 27, John Beta rated it really liked it.

    I always enjoy the reliable thriller-mystery, with a dash of horror read in between my other readings. However, I should have read Brimstone and Dance of Death first.

    Shame on me for not reading more reviews and blogs on this. I was still entertained by the clever Agent Pendergast and his cohorts.

    Dec 08, Sophiene rated it really liked it Shelves: I just love the mix of history and thriller. Especially the museum history is fascinating.

    I'll try to get more of these. May 18, Cherie rated it it was amazing Shelves: And now I know the story of Constance Green and Diogenes Pendergast and I am caught up with the beginning of the series and the "Pendergast Trilogy" is behind me.

    Too many bad experiences, I think. I really enjoyed Scott Brick's narration of the story and look forward to hearing him again.

    Apr 17, Carol rated it it was ok. I did not care for this book at all. There are too many subplots-- 1 the opening of an Egyptian tomb at the NY Natural History Museum is plagued by murders, 2 a clever prison breakout, 3 a weird young lady living in a sumptuous mansion in New York, 4 two brothers, one good, one evil and each gifted in his own way, are connected by a traumatic event that occurred when they were little boys.

    All of the disconnected subplots and the sheer volume of characters left me thinking I needed to take n I did not care for this book at all.

    All of the disconnected subplots and the sheer volume of characters left me thinking I needed to take notes. I was constantly trying to remember who this or that person was.

    Not to mention that the revenge one brother seeks to exact on all mankind because of his childhood trauma is both bizarre and completely unhinged and not believable at all.

    I mean, did I miss something? He crawls into a large magician's box when he's 7 and he sees something so evil which is never fully explained that now as a man, he wants to kill everybody.

    And when the aforementioned weird young lady, who is a minor character in two chapters of the book, appears at the climax and is largely responsible for the slam dunk ending, I closed the book thinking, "Uh, that was freakin bizarre.

    For one thing, I wanted to know what was in that valise that Dionysius carried with him. Were there body parts in there?

    What was in there that so traumatized the cop when he opened it!? What was the horrible trauma the young Dionysius experienced that made him turn evil as a man!?

    Having said all that, I will say that the writing itself was intelligent and well constructed. Too bad it was a ridiculous plot.

    The Book of the Dead 83 82 Jan 19, Diogenes 13 37 Sep 05, Interesting historical connection to Pendergast 65 78 Oct 23, Douglas Preston was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in , and grew up in the deadly boring suburb of Wellesley.

    Following a distinguished career at a private nursery school--he was almost immediately expelled--he attended public schools and the Cambridge School of Weston.

    Notable events in his early life included the loss of a fingertip at the age of three to a bicycle; the loss of his two fr Douglas Preston was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in , and grew up in the deadly boring suburb of Wellesley.

    Notable events in his early life included the loss of a fingertip at the age of three to a bicycle; the loss of his two front teeth to his brother Richard's fist; and various broken bones, also incurred in dust-ups with Richard.

    Richard went on to write The Hot Zone and The Cobra Event, which tells you all you need to know about what it was like to grow up with him as a brother.

    As they grew up, Doug, Richard, and their little brother David roamed the quiet suburbs of Wellesley, terrorizing the natives with home-made rockets and incendiary devices mail-ordered from the backs of comic books or concocted from chemistry sets.

    With a friend they once attempted to fly a rocket into Wellesley Square; the rocket malfunctioned and nearly killed a man mowing his lawn.

    They were local celebrities, often appearing in the "Police Notes" section of The Wellesley Townsman. It is a miracle they survived childhood intact.

    After unaccountably being rejected by Stanford University a pox on it , Preston attended Pomona College in Claremont, California, where he studied mathematics, biology, physics, anthropology, chemistry, geology, and astronomy before settling down to English literature.

    Ancient Egyptians believed in magic and the book is actually a collection of magical speeches and prayers that would be used by the person that died.

    It was designed to help and guide them so that they could pass the spiritual tests and enter the afterlife. They belief that you would also join the gods and live in a place called field of reeds.

    Many of the chapters of the book are written on papyrus paper, but some are also found on coffins, scarabs, tomb walls and even other funeral objects.

    They include illustrations and pictures that sometimes show the individual person as they make their journey to their afterlife. Pharaohs and wealthy families would have personal inscriptions, but the average middle class family could not usually afford the cost.

    The book of the dead dates back to the Egyptian old kingdom and is basically a tradition of funerary manuscripts. One of the first texts that you will find this out a pyramid texts and these actually date back to BCE.

    It was during the middle Kingdom era that a new text emerged called coffin texts. It was basically a new version of language, it also had new spells and illustrations.

    Texts were written on the inner surface of coffins and sometimes on tomb walls. This language was mainly available the wealthy who could afford coffin text and therefore help them in the afterlife.

    The Egyptian civilization lasted 3, years and throughout the time there were different versions of the Book of The Dead.

    The various spells that were created by the priests depended upon the importance of the gods and goddesses of the time. At that time, it was normal to include images of their gods.

    It is believed that the Book of the Dead is a collection of stories from various traditions. This is because some of the wording in the book is strangely opposite of other wording in the book.

    One of the main parts of the Book of the Dead is showing the process that the person who has died must go through.

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